A cold night, right after the first summer shower while I sipped the first coffee of the season, I stumbled across memories from this beautiful place 95 kms away from Indore. I scrolled through the pictures on my laptop, and I was struck. I wanted to go beyond the known places, places where my imagination runs wild and weaves history. 


Fading colours, dusty floors, lush green surroundings, broken windows, musty smell and lost stories; these are all the things that wait for you at the historic grandeur of this Malwa region. 


It was a sudden decision to drive there early in the morning. I wanted to go back again and live the ruins. Meandering through a foggy and cold morning, taking a stop at Manpur and having shots of 2 cut chai, we were all set to hit the place.


Mandu, the city that has its roots back in the pre 13th century, is a bliss to your traveller soul. And if you are a person like me who loves to turn the pages of an old history book, you will certainly find it intriguing to trace the presence of Mandav in the Delhi Sultanate, Khilji dynasty and Mughal Sultanate.  


The small town in central India is known for being an important political and cultural centre of the past. Located at the height of 600 m it is a place that offers you the best breeze and a heavenly feeling.


The monuments in the city are divided into three major groups: The Village Group, the Royal Enclave and the Rewa Kund group. Talking about the groups, The Village group consists of Jama Masjid, Ashrafi Mahal, and Hoshag Shah Tomb that are great to enjoy while taking a casual stroll in the evening. The Royal Enclave takes you on a tour of the Jahaz Mahal, Hindola Mahal, Taveli Mahal, Jal Mahal, Dilawar Khan Mosque, Royal Palace, Champa Baodi, Gada Shah Palace, Munj Talao, Kapur Talao and Hammam. One can easily spend  2 -3 hours here and relax. Moving on to the last of the lot, the Rewa Kund group leaves you speechless with its class and an unforgettable romantic saga of Rani Roopmati and Baz Bahadur’s story. They say their romanticism still haunts that place. For me, it was all love in the air.


However, the ghosts of the past might still reside in the corridors today, here are the lesser known ruins that I could catch in my camera. 

Gada Shah Shop: The 16th Century Shopping Hot- Spot
Who would hesitate to hop in and enjoy the fascinating remains?
Ujala Baodi: The old water conservation system.
Another picture from the Gada Shah Shop
Hathi Mahal: The place where they kept the elephants but now the place is a mosque.
Main court of Baz Bahadur’s Palace
Hathi Paga Mahal: Right where they fed the elephants
A Darwaza that stands tall at the ghat right before you enter the beautiful city. 
Taveli Mahal which is now the Jahaj Mahal Hotel 
Jahaj Mahal: The Hidden Gem that housed Mohammad Shah son’s harem of 15,000 women. 
Full view of the front lake (The picture was taken at 5 am in the morning.) Isn’t this mesmerising? 

So, what do you think? 


Would you like to visit this crumbling trip to the past or do you prefer the grandeur of well-preserved? 


Tell me in the comments guys!


If you drive there, you will be able to witness old tombs and gates at a stretch of every 100 metres. Some are named while some have an unknown history and a lot of secrets. Having arrived there with a lot of knowledge that my mother gave me (she knows the place by heart,) we ditched the normal travel trail and took the entire trip exploring the lesser known ruins on foot. But for the ones who are new to the place, here are the details that you must know.

Duration: 2 days 

Places to visit: Jama Masjid, Ashrafi Mahal, and Hoshag Shah Tomb, Jahaz Mahal, Hindola Mahal, Taveli Mahal, Jal Mahal, Dilawar Khan Mosque, Royal Palace, Champa Baodi, Gada Shah Palace, Munj Talao, Kapur Talao and Hammam, Rani Rupmati Pavilion, Baaz Bahadur Palace, and the sunset point.

Places to eat: Relax Point (Breakfast,) Shivani Restaurant (Dal Bafna,) Malwa Retreat Cafeteria, Malwa Resort.

Places to stay: Malwa Resort, Malwa Retreat (MPSTDC,) and Rupmati Hotel. 

Until my next post,
Lots of Love

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